Posts in category sans-serif - page 8

Everest

This font started life in 2005 as “Tall Order” and “Tall Order Bold” before being brushed off and two new condensed variants joined. The font was also renamed to better indicate this is a font that is all about the height and little consideration is given to the descenders.

Wordplay aside this font works quite well although those descenders do feel a bit awkward. Given we’ve used all the pixels there isn’t much that could be done unless your custom renderer can draw p, q, y, and g 1 pixel lower. Alternatively use the FZX renderer with the already tweaked FZX version of the font included in the download.

Envious

My Envy Code R font has been quite popular and its history goes back through Envy Code B and A bitmap fonts… right back to my Plotter font on the Sinclair Spectrum.

Back in 2006, I thought it would be interesting to complete the circle and try to shrink the feel of Envy Code R back down to a byte-sized version and the result is a pleasing, easy on the eyes sans.

This font is very readable and suits a lot of clean easy to read scenarios although it would benefit from using a 7 pixel wide (regular style) or proportional renderer (all) to reduce the character spacing. Unusually it comes with both a bold and italic style and also a serif variant.

Can be seen in UzeboxUI.

District

This typeface started as a 2006 BASIN production as Little Shadow, Little Shadow Bold, and Small Outline. I decided to combine them under a new name for this release - District - and produce a regular variant, the missing bold weight for the outline, and a squared version District Digital. Toward the end of 2020, I added a “Comic” style for further fun.

The plain styles work well in many scenarios, the outline works best as dark text on a light background, and the shadow requires that dark ink on a light paper to achieve the effect.

District Digital

A 2018 digital take on the District font that started as just one variant but as the other styles of District grew it made more sense to split it out into its own so it could get bold, outline, and bold outline variants without making the former typeface collection too large.

While the font is not too dissimilar to District the angular and sharp edge contrasts give it quite a different feel and it is much better suited for tech-inspired scenarios. The non-outline versions work great for all scenarios and the outlines can work great for titles when the background is lighter than the font color.