Posts tagged with 1960s - page 2

ZX OCR-A

American Type Founders designed the OCR-A font in 1968 to aid machines in recognizing the characters optically long before advanced OCR technologies were available. The goal was to be both machine and human-readable, and it was a great success and is still used today in a variety of places despite being followed by the more human-friendly OCR-B.

I created this liberal adaptation on the Sinclair Spectrum +3 using Artist II in the late 1980s. The distinctive style shines through even at this tiny size.

This font works well if you want a dated view of technological progress.

Magnetic

I designed this font back in the late 80s on the Spectrum using Artist II and this ‘futuristic’ style has long been a staple of games and is one of the more generic-looking magnetic-reader influenced types.

The font works okay for large runs of text and great for titles, dialog boxes and pop-ups although some of the other styles of this I’ve worked on offer more a more unique take on this (see the consider section for those)

Gemini

I designed this font in 2019 using BASIN as an interpretation of the circa-1965 font ‘Gemini Computer’.

While heavily influenced by magnetic fonts of the time it isn’t designed as such and instead takes on a strong aggressive use of blocks to achieve a style that breaks away from the oft-used “futuristic” magnetic “MOCR” style fonts.

This font works surprisingly well for long runs of text like adventure games and has a somewhat chaotic futuristic feel.

A second variant has been added called ‘Gemini Radar’ that echoes the last column of pixels one offset off to give an ‘echo’ feel. Use this sparingly.

Computing 60s

I designed this font back in 2006 in BASIN as a tribute to advertisements for computers in the late 60s and early 70s.

Doubtlessly inspired by the magnetic OCR style fonts, it deviated by replacing the unsightly blobs with bold sections that ran to the nearest edge to give it a smoother feel. The most likely actual typeface used for these ads was probably Countdown

This font works great for titles and small runs of text, and at a stretch, you can use it even for low-density text adventures.