Posts tagged with coding-fonts - page 4

Envy Code R preview #6 released with Visual Studio italics

A newer version of Envy Code R is available.

Preview of the 461 glyphs in Envy Code R at point size 10 on Windows with ClearType.The last few days have been frantic ones putting the final touches to the next release of the Envy Code R typeface as I bring it closer to my idea of the perfect coding font.

Many glyphs have been redrawn, curves improved and a many additional characters and symbols added bringing the number of glyphs to 461 – enough to cover common European and US code pages including Windows/ISO 1250 & 1252 as well as MacOS Roman and a few others.

There was some interest in a bold variant and so once that was done I felt the urge to make an italic one too:

Envy Code R font in size 10 and size 20 showing bold, regular and italic variants.

Phew!

As a bonus I’ve created a variant that overcomes Visual Studio’s aversion to italics by marking the italic font as bold. Choose ‘Envy Code R VS’ in the Font and Colors part of Visual Studio’s Options and choose bold wherever you want italics.

Here’s a sample at 10 point/ClearType with my own color scheme:

Envy Code R at point 10 in Visual Studio with italics!

Yummy.

A few things to note:

  • The new glyphs for accented characters, ligatures etc. might not be correct, they’re new to me
  • Bitmaps are missing so if you don’t use smoothing/anti-aliasing/ClearType stick to the prior PR4 release
  • Optimal size: Windows 10 point, Java 13 point and Mac OS X 12.5 point but looks good at larger sizes too
  • Some glyphs will be improved (96?&) but others can’t (WwMm@) as there are no more pixels to play with
  • At some sizes individual letters aren’t the right height, e.g. u,v,x at 12 point (damn hinting)

Download of this older version no longer available.

Feel free to leave comments and suggestions here (or better yet blog about it!)

[)amien

Envy Code R preview #6 forthcoming

Envy Code R has been updated since this post.

I have been experimenting with Envy Code R over the last few months – everything from creating a bold version to delta hinting with Visual TrueType with mixed results.

Part of the problem is that at larger sizes the odd shapes and over-emphasized curves that I drew to make the font look great at 10-point with ClearType on makes it look awkward at larger sizes.

Last weekend, I went back to the drawing board, literally, to try and improve on the shapes without impacting too much on the 10-point size ClearType version. The result is as follows;

Envy Code R preview 6

And for comparison, the old version:

Envy Code R preview 5

Let me know your thoughts in the comments, even if it’s just to say your prefer PR6, Consolas or something else. Be sure to mention what size and whether you have ClearType on (or if you are using a Mac).

[)amien

Italic syntax highlighting in Visual Studio 2005

I came across a posting by Thomas Restrepo about a theme for Vim he likes called Wombat and how it wouldn’t be worth porting to Visual Studio as it doesn’t support italic syntax highlighting – as we all know.

This got me thinking and I was able to port it with italics although the process is a bit of a hack.

If I can figure out a way of making this hack re-distributable without infringing on copyrights I’ll follow this one up.

In the meantime here’s a screen-shot of it in action using Consolas.

Visual Studio 2005 with italics

I can’t stand using vim for .NET – I’ve got better things to do than commit the entire .NET Framework to memory. I remember watching a WPF screen-cast where the guy was using “his trusty editor” (vim or emacs – I forget ;-) and going on about the great keyboard short-cuts whilst constantly trying different method names, compiling yet again and finally looking up help in the absence of IntelliSense.

I did however check out the latest trunk of SharpDevelop this weekend and was quite impressed with both the product and the source code. There was a bit of flickering with the solution explorer and the icons seem to be a bit of a steal-and-mash but otherwise looks first class.

[)amien

Red Hat releases Liberation fonts

Linux vendor Red Hat have released a font family named Liberation under a GPL license.

The family consists of three typefaces known as Liberation Serif, Liberation Sans and Liberation Mono each in normal, italic, bold and bold italic variants. The fonts are not hinted in this initial release so may not look too great on-screen at some sizes. Red Hat expect to release better-looking hinted versions in the future. Having attempted hinting Envy Code R font myself they have my sympathy.

These new fonts are designed to be metric-compatible (and therefore interchangeable) with the standard Windows fonts of Times New Roman, Arial and Courier New intending to “Liberate” documents from Microsoft’s fonts. Bearing in mind Office 2007 pushes new typefaces as the default I’m not sure how successful this will be long-term.

Microsoft’s typefaces were designed to be metric-compatible with the classic Times Roman (1931), Helvetica (1957) and Courier (1955) typefaces in the first place so perhaps Red Hat would have been better off licensing or mimicking those instead.

Screen shots follow.

Windows

The Liberation fonts on Windows using ClearType alongside the Windows fonts they intend to replace. The free Bitstream Vera family equivalent is also shown (only Vera Sans Mono is metric-compatible).

Mac

Microsoft’s Windows fonts alongside Apple’s versions of the originals and the Liberation fonts again all rendered with Mac OS X and sub-pixel precision aliasing. Point sizes have been increased by 3pt to compensate for the difference in on-screen DPI.

[)amien