Posts tagged with decorative - page 5

Egyptian Mercy

There are times when designing a font you just doodle a few characters and it flows through to define the rest of the font. Egyptian Mercy is one of these that I thought up in 2006 and was original enough that I’d spend hours trying to come up with a real TrueType scalable version - an effort that got nowhere once the realization came that the charm and effect derived entirely from square pixels.

In typography terms, Egyptian has a specific meaning - one that I’ve completely ignored here in favor of the more common idea of hieroglyphics with crazy square spirals and triangles standing in for circles to give it also a futuristic feel. It mostly reminds me of the architectural details in Deckard’s apartment in Blade Runner.

It works very well for unique looking titles, menus, and pop-ups but you’d been hurting players if you tried to set a whole text adventure in this.

Can be seen in Scroll of the Time Lords.

Diamond

This design started with trying very specific diamond shapes but soon took on more irregularity to deal with the size constraints. Combined with the lower-case characters not joining up the counters it took on a rough unpolished look evoking old-time adventure.

The font works well for large runs of prose.

Blood Rain

I created this font in 2007 as a dark, brooding, oppressive font that instills a sense of dread - or at least as much as you can with a handful of pixels.

It is a bold font with a limited vertical height to facilitate the single-pixel-wide streaks.

This font is still readable enough for a chilling text adventure.

Can be seen in Vampire Vengeance.

Bamboo

I designed this in 2006 for use with BASIN, and it was called “Woody Tastic” as part of my misguided plan of naming fonts after people in the Spectrum emulation scene.

It now has a new name - Bamboo - that better reflects the style of bent bamboo sticks lashed together with leaves and could be thematic for a text adventure set on a desert island.

You should probably experiment with how well it renders for your intended audience as it has detail that can easily get lost.