Posts tagged with family

CannonFire

Occasionally when working on a font, I’ll struggle with a specific glyph and push it in different ways to find something that works. Sometimes, the “very different” will lead to a font entirely on its own, which led to CannonFire.

It’s very angular, sharp in places with very distinctive uppercase and tight lowercase. As is often the case with narrower fonts, you really could do with a proportional renderer here to get the characters much closer together.

It’s quite pleasant for titles and options screens, and you can use it for short runs of text. There are a bold variant and an “open” variant that opens up some of the counters.

Striker

An early 2020 release that has sat languishing for some time before publication. There’s some similarity with Reynolds which has held it back but when you look at screenshots in both there’s quite a subtle difference in the font size and choices in edges and letterforms.

While Reynolds would look nice on the side of a starship this one would look better on a crate or munition in a sci-fi environment. It works quite well on lists and information screens. The bold variant works okay for prose as well but the lighter weights feel too stretched for comfortable reading.

Golden Air

Air America was an airline from 1950 through the 1970s that looked to all appearances to be a regular airline. In reality, it was covertly-owned by the US Government for CIA operations to access places the US Military could not. Employee William G. Sherman took courses in typography drafting and created an entire typeface based on their logo. Much later, his son reached out to the Internet in turning that typeface into a digital version, and Aaron Bell of Saja Typeworks took up the task.

As well as adding a somewhat complimentary lower-case I created a semi-bold, bold and “Rangers” variant that adds serifs for a more military look. They all work well for most types of usage, with the upper-case standing out the most.

Scribe

This is a recent attempt to take a hand-flowing form and make it look elegant and precise - as if it was written by a scribe. (The font I previously called Scribe was renamed to Parchment as it’s far too haphazard for such a name).

This font is a 2020 creation and works surprisingly well in titles, prose and indeed lists. It would work very well for a historical text adventure and shines on old CRT displays or emulators with CRT effects.

Bold, condensed, and smaller-lowercase versions were subsequently added, and then inspiration arrived for two further variations - an ‘Eire’ Irish inspired version and a ‘Hylean’ one taking cues from a Legend of Zelda Manga.