Posts tagged with futuristic - page 4

Needlecast

A design of mine for BASIN in 2005 where the name defined the font. I was naming fonts after some members of the Sinclair Spectrum emulation scene and the surname Needle inspired “Needlecast” - a technique for transferring consciousness from sci-fi novel Altered Carbon.

I went with a super-wide, sharp, and short angular style and put together regular and bold weights.

It works well for text and titles and the 5-pixel height with no descenders means with a custom renderer you could squeeze 39 lines on a Spectrum screen (normally 24).

Magnetic

I designed this font back in the late 80s on the Spectrum using Artist II and this ‘futuristic’ style has long been a staple of games and is one of the more generic-looking magnetic-reader influenced types.

The font works okay for large runs of text and great for titles, dialog boxes and pop-ups although some of the other styles of this I’ve worked on offer more a more unique take on this (see the consider section for those)

IoBus

I designed this font in 2018 initially as a rectangular version of the 1920s Cinema but it quickly took on a feel of its own and with some narrowing of the glyphs and alternative flair switched style completely and detached from the past entirely.

Now it almost feels like a stream of binary 1s and 0s flying out of a device port…

This font very well for titles and list screens but a little heavy on the eyes for long runs of text like text adventures.

Gemini

I designed this font in 2019 using BASIN as an interpretation of the circa-1965 font ‘Gemini Computer’.

While heavily influenced by magnetic fonts of the time it isn’t designed as such and instead takes on a strong aggressive use of blocks to achieve a style that breaks away from the oft-used “futuristic” MOCR style fonts.

This font works surprisingly well for long runs of text like adventure games and has a somewhat chaotic futuristic feel.

A second variant has been added called ‘Gemini Radar’ that echos the last column of pixels one offset off to give an ‘echo’ feel. Use this sparingly.