Posts tagged with futuristic - page 5

Datel Tribute

I designed this font some time back in the 90s using Artist II as a tribute to the font used by Datel Electronics on their products and ads (they used something less extreme by the time they became a 16-bit Action Replay only shop).

I subsequently found out the font is STOP created in 1971 by Italian type designer Aldo Novares. There is quite a variance as I only had the letters in Datel’s ads to go by and even then it was a bit of a liberal interpretation.

A second “Replay” variant was added in 2019.

The font works well for titles and is also usable for small runs of text/lists.

Can be seen in Astronaut Labyrinth.

Coolant

I created this font in 2018 thinking about the old flowing chrome letters of 60s refrigerators. It breaks the horizontal line a little bit to make it more practical.

This font works great for titles and lists but also can work quite well for descriptions and prose too if you want an italic hand that is a bit more regular than many scripts.

Conapt

I love observing typography in the real world and building signage is one of my favorites with a special place for Neutra, Clarendon, and Century Gothic.

My first attempt at this - again in BASIN this year (2019) - looked very much like my other sans so I took a second stab this time at a futuristic one and it came out rather well. The name - Conapt - is taken from Condo and Apartment joined together which has been used in various sci-fi movies as their name for compact housing and it has a distinct Blade Runner feel.

This font works well for titles and lists as well as long blocks of futuristic prose.

Computing 60s

I designed this font back in 2006 in BASIN as a tribute to the advertisements for computers in the late 60s and early 70s.

No doubt inspired by the magnetic OCR style fonts it deviated by replacing the unsightly blobs with bold sections that ran to the nearest edge to give it a smoother feel. The most likely actual typeface used for these ads was probably Countdown

This font works great for titles and small runs of text and at a stretch you can use it even for low-density text adventures.