Posts tagged with old

Runed

Runes predate our Latin based alphabet and directly informed and influenced it in many ways. Many of the earlier ones are not too recognizable but taking the Anglo-Saxon runes and a bunch of liberties.

The result is something quite readable by modern eyes even on low-resolutions screens.

Halfling

A 2020 exploration into old-style hand-scripts such as you’d find in Lord of the Rings or Dungeons & Dragons.

Not based on any specific script but rather an amalgamation of styles then smoothed out to create one of its own. The capitals are broad and short (much like a halfling or Hobbit) and have some Uncial feel yet with sharper Dwarven-inspired angles. The lower-case letters flow, borrowing a little from Elvish.

It works quite well for the obligatory titles, status and menu screens, especially for medieval or fantasy games. Longer prose may work for your audience too.

Scribe

This is a recent attempt to take a hand-flowing form and make it look elegant and precise - as if it was written by a scribe. (The font I previously called Scribe was renamed to Parchment as it’s far too haphazard for such a name).

This font is a 2020 creation and works surprisingly well in titles, prose and indeed lists. It would work very well for a historical text adventure and shines on old CRT displays or emulators with CRT effects.

Bold, condensed, and smaller-lowercase versions were subsequently added, and then inspiration arrived for two further variations - an ‘Eire’ Irish inspired version and a ‘Hylean’ one taking cues from a Legend of Zelda Manga.

Byteletter

Artist II is the art program that got me hooked on creating fonts with its built-in font editor. I picked it up in a bundle with a mouse and interface from Datel in the 80s and could barely put it down. Artist II came with a few fonts - a bold font, a futuristic font, and most interestingly, a Blackletter/Old English font that amazed me for so many years to come.

In 2019 I thought I’d try designing a blackletter, specifically the Textura style. I intentionally avoided looking at the “Old English” one from The Artist II to avoid similarities, and I’m glad I did. While that font had narrow non-bold lower-case, mine takes on a thicker, more stand-out style. Both fonts struggle to get the necessary curves and flourishes in the capitals, but with only 8x8 pixels, your options are limited. Along the way, I tried an alternative style which resulted in Scribe.

This font works pretty well for runs of text and prose but avoids using capital letters next to each other as the density can turn it into something quite incomprehensible.