Posts tagged with sharp - page 6

Deaf Metal

Yet another font I created for the BASIN package around 2006 that wasn’t so much designed as burst forth as metal music should.

The glyphs are overly bold, angular, and overtly aggressive. I revised a few of them since the 2006 release to fix some height issues with some of the lower-case letters.

The final result works better for large runs of text than you’d expect given the style but it works best used sparingly.

In 2020 I added a new attempt at the style. It’s an interesting different take using small caps for lower-case and is actually based on the square version which was itself an attempt at Soviet poster typography.

Can be seen in HELL YEAH!.

Conapt

I love observing typography in the real world and building signage is one of my favorites with a special place for Neutra, Clarendon, and Century Gothic.

My first attempt at this - again in BASIN this year (2019) - looked very much like my other sans so I took a second stab this time at a futuristic one and it came out rather well. The name - Conapt - is taken from Condo and Apartment joined together which has been used in various sci-fi movies as their name for compact housing and it has a distinct Blade Runner feel.

I tweaked the font in 2020 to correct some alignment and style issues (r,x,V etc) and added the semi-bold and bold weights.

This font works well for titles and lists as well as long blocks of futuristic prose.

Computing 60s

I designed this font back in 2006 in BASIN as a tribute to advertisements for computers in the late 60s and early 70s.

Doubtlessly inspired by the magnetic OCR style fonts, it deviated by replacing the unsightly blobs with bold sections that ran to the nearest edge to give it a smoother feel. The most likely actual typeface used for these ads was probably Countdown

This font works great for titles and small runs of text, and at a stretch, you can use it even for low-density text adventures.

Computer

I designed this font back in 2019 in BASIN to interpret the 1968 font Moore Computer developed by James H. Moore of Typographic House in 1968.

This typeface is a heavily-magnetic “MOCR” font with that distinct dated futuristic feel. It is a little more aggressive than most magnetic fonts in the 8x8 format popular in games.

This font works great for titles and small runs of text, and, at a stretch, you can even use it for low-density text adventures.