Posts tagged with space - page 2

Star Ranger

The font is a fresh creation from 2019 with inspiration out of nowhere. A few letters in it took a life of its own as it wraps and sparkles with a futuristic flair.

This font works well for small sequences of text that require a unique futuristic stylized feel.

It is not recommended for large blocks of text or on low-fidelity displays.

Space Opera

I created this font in 2018 as a tribute to the Star Wars logo.

The letters work well for a monospace as many glyphs fill the width with joining lines. It manages to be a flowing font without the jagged edges loops and diagonals impose.

It works surprisingly well for titles and lists and isn’t too bad even for full blocks of text.

Reynolds

I seem to have this knack for creating a font based on memories and when I compare it to the actual thing it’s quite different. This happened once again with this font which I thought I was drawing in 2018 in the style of some text I’d seen in Firefly and Serenity and so named it Reynolds after Captain Malcolm Reynolds. Searching online shows no such typographical style in Firefly at all!

This is a semi-futuristic font that would look good on the side of a starship though.

Can be seen in Last Train to Tranz-Central and ZHL.

Reactor

A 2020 creation for a very bold square oblique font reminiscent of many a computer and games advertisement in the 90s once the 70s magnetic-OCR styles just couldn’t cut it any longer. A very similar typeface adorned the Protovision advert that was the story catalyst in the movie WarGames.

I added two non-oblique versions to compliment this typeface as part of a set - Serif and Regular - however, they are both quite similar to the existing fonts in the collection - Tentacle and Precinct but these versions better align if you want a single smart style. These three styles work well in a variety of scenarios including text, prose, headings, and lists.

Additionally a “Zone” style gives the feeling of a stencil or reflected mountain landscape while “Leak” gives a particle-decay/shaded look. Both are best suited for headings or title screens.