WordPress to Jekyll part 5 - Hosting & building

Part of my series on migrating from WordPress to Jekyll.

  1. My history & reasoning
  2. Comments & commenting
  3. Site search
  4. Categories & tags
  5. Hosting & building

The next stage is considering where to host the site and whether to use a content delivery network (CDN). My preferred approach on other sites has been to:

  1. Host the origin on GitHub pages - it’s fast to build and integrates with my source control
  2. Front it with Amazon’s AWS CloudFront CDN - it’s fast, cheap and comes with a free SSL cert

Adding the CloudFront CDN was essential if you wanted SSL plus your own domain name but May sGitHub pages added support for SSL certs with custom domains

Unfortunately my blog is a bit more complex than the other sites I’ve done and two of the plugins I use have not been white-listed for use on GitHub pages. They are:

  1. paginate-v2 which is required to get great tag & category support
  2. Algolia which is needed for search indexing

Part of GitHub’s blazing speed comes from a trusted environment and while I’m sure they’ll be white-listing paginate-v2 in the short term I’m not sure if the Algolia indexer is on the cards.

CircleCI build server

There are always plenty of options in the cloud so I looked for a build server. I’ve used AppVeyor, CodeShip and Travis CI before but decided to this time go with CircleCI as I wanted to try their new faster v2 docker-based infrastructure and take advantage of their free tier.

The v2 mechanism requires a new .circleci/config.yml that splits the process into jobs that are combined with a workflow. I created two jobs - one for the build and another for the deploy. They are:

version: 2
jobs:
  build:
    docker:
      - image: circleci/ruby:2.3
    working_directory: ~/jekyll
    environment:
      - JEKYLL_ENV=production
      - NOKOGIRI_USE_SYSTEM_LIBRARIES=true
      - JOB_RESULTS_PATH=run-results
    steps:
      - checkout
      - restore_cache:
          key: jekyll-{{ .Branch }}-{{ checksum "Gemfile.lock" }}
      - run:
          name: Install dependencies
          command: bundle check --path=vendor/bundle || bundle install --path=vendor/bundle --jobs=4 --retry=3
      - save_cache:
          key: jekyll-{{ .Branch }}-{{ checksum "Gemfile.lock" }}
          paths:
            - "vendor/bundle"
      - run:
          name: Create results directory
          command: mkdir -p $JOB_RESULTS_PATH
      - run:
          name: Build site
          command: bundle exec jekyll build 2>&1 | tee $JOB_RESULTS_PATH/build-results.txt
      - run:
          name: Remove .html suffixes
          command: find _site -name "*.html" -not -name "index.html" -exec rename -v 's/\.html$//' {} \;
      - run:
          name: Index with Algolia
          command: bundle exec jekyll algolia
      - store_artifacts:
          path: run-results/
          destination: run-results
      - persist_to_workspace:
          root: ~/jekyll
          paths:
            - _site

Origin hosting with S3

Given I’m going to use CloudFront for my CDN and that GitHub pages won’t work for this job I went with S3. I know it well, the command line tools are great, it’s cheap, fast and integrates well with CloudFront.

S3 did however bring a few problems with it’s own - primarily because the links on my blog had no file suffixes - I didn’t want either .php or .html and WordPress makes this a breeze.

Here’s my CircleCI job to deploy to S3. It involves:

  1. Starting with Python to get the AWS command-line tools
  2. Syncing the static site forcing everything as text/html to deal with the lack of file extensions
  3. Fixing up the few files I have that require a different MIME type (css, feed, robots etc)
  4. Creating a few helpful redirects for backward compatibility with existing links in the wild

(This configuration requires you’ve setup the AWS access key and secret in Circle for the command-line tools to use.)

deploy:
  docker:
    - image: circleci/python:2.7
    working_directory: ~/jekyll
  steps:
    - attach_workspace:
        at: ~/jekyll
    - run:
        name: Install awscli
        command: sudo pip install awscli
    - run:
        name: Deploy to S3
        command: aws s3 sync _site s3://damieng-static/ --delete --content-type=text/html
    - run:
        name: Correct MIME for robots.txt automatically
        command: aws s3 cp s3://damieng-static/robots.txt s3://damieng-static/robots.txt --metadata-directive="REPLACE"
    - run:
        name: Correct MIME for sitemap.xml automatically
        command: aws s3 cp s3://damieng-static/sitemap.xml s3://damieng-static/sitemap.xml --metadata-directive="REPLACE"
    - run:
        name: Correct MIME for Atom feed manually
        command: aws s3 cp s3://damieng-static/feed.xml s3://damieng-static/feed.xml --no-guess-mime-type --content-type="application/atom+xml" --metadata-directive="REPLACE"
    - run:
        name: Redirect /damieng for existing RSS subscribers
        command: aws s3api put-object --bucket damieng-static --key "damieng" --website-redirect-location "https://damieng.com/feed.xml"
    - run:
        name: Correct MIME for CSS files
        command: aws s3 cp s3://damieng-static/css s3://damieng-static/css --metadata-directive="REPLACE" --recursive

Tying together the build

Finally you just need a workflow to tie these two steps together at the end of your .circleci/config.yml

workflows:
  version: 2
  build-deploy:
    jobs:
      - build
      - deploy:
          requires:
            - build
          filters:
            branches:
              only: master

A complete version of my circle config is available.

CloudFront CDN

Adding the CloudFront CDN is pretty easy and well covered elsewhere. I’ll just point out that you must paste in the origin domain name from S3 and not choose the S3 bucket in the drop down. The latter ties CloudFront to the storage directly and ignores MIME types, redirects etc. By pasting the origin name in you’re taking advantage of the S3 WebSite features that make redirects etc. possible.

Also, while testing, you might want to specify a low TTL of say 120 (2 minutes) until things are fully stable.

[)amien

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